Feb 7, 2009

Columbian Discoveries

A recent foray into the hinterlands of Columbia has turned up oodles of new critters. About 60 species of amphibians, 20 reptiles, and almost 120 birds were recorded, many of which are brand new species. And guess what, no where is there any mention of a new spider species. That might be a first.

Amphibians are considered to be leading indicators for environmental problems, and the fact that so many were found is a good sign, says Conservation International, who spearheaded the project. Columbia is considered to be one of the most biologically diverse countries in the world for amphibians, with 754 species recorded. It's a veritable Noah's Ark (if a moist, slimy, and slippery one).

So, enjoy this salamander (Bolitogloss taylori) and glass frog (Nymphargus sp.). It's nice to bring some good news.

Thanks for the article, Betsy.

Photo source: Telegraph.co.uk

7 comments:

Flartus said...

Heeyyyy...that froggy is downright adorable! Lookit; he's smiling. Surely you're holding back some of the truly ugly ones for future use?

LibrarianJessica said...

There's something about that frog that reminds me of Steve Urkel.

Jade said...

Don't worry, I'll go there and find all the new spiders they missed in a few more years ;)

Raging Wombat said...

No, no. That's all right Jade. No hurries.

Kit said...

Perhaps all the abundance of amphibians is because they have an abundance of witches turning everyone into newts. Awww, lookit that little guy. He's a newty-cutie.

Danielle said...

Oh my gosh, that frog is super cute. His eyes are all squinty like he's smiling about something...perhaps he just snacked on a delicious bug.

Eduardo said...

It is not Columbia, it is Colombia