Feb 19, 2009

Katydid Pink

I feel compelled to make up for my parasite post yesterday. Consider this a peace offering. Nothing terribly ugly about katydids (though being an insect is one strike against them), but these ones have caught the attention of the Bleimans over at Zooillogix, and now I bring them to you. Thanks to Vincent for alerting me of their presence.






















An interesting note about katydids (who have just joined my daughters' imaginary tea party, along with the shocking pink dragon millipede, the pink fairy armadillo, and the pink iguana): there is no evidence that two pink katydids can mate and have offspring. Our records show that pink katydids come from a pink female and a green male. Hmm, there might be something behind the whole Miss Piggy and Kermit the Frog love affair...


7 comments:

Ugly Deaf Muslim Punk Gurl! said...

soooooooooo beautiful.

LibrarianJessica said...

Pink is for girls. :-D

Kit said...

Ah, your pink insects have appeased my disgust at parasites. I totally want one. In a little tiny top hat.

Gette said...

My first thought was, "Flamingo diet!"

No camouflage for these critters at all, is there?

ilikedginger said...

Ok, first of all, I LOVE this blog. So much.

Secondly, have you seen the pink grasshoppers? They are soo gorgeous.

Then there's this one, which I can't figure out what kind of bug it is:
http://travel.mongabay.com/suriname/images/suriname_1036.html

and more katydids!
http://www.pinktentacle.com/2007/09/pink-white-katydids-found-in-osaka/

Looove it and love the critters and creeps on this site. Even the parasites.

Denita TwoDragons said...

This is much easier on the eyes than...*shudder*...parasites that aren't so easy on the eyes. Yay for pink katydids!

--TwoDragons

Anonymous said...

>>Then there's this one, which I can't figure out what kind of bug it is:
http://travel.mongabay.com/suriname/images/suriname_1036.html

It's a leafhopper (family Cicadellidae) nymph of some kind, but identifying the species will probably require an expert. Not only are there tons of species, but the nymphs often change quite a bit every time they shed their skin.