Jul 31, 2007

Large Insects Need Identifying

I've got some readers who need help. They've stumbled upon large insects they cannot identify. Can any of you help? I know there are some great sites out there to help ID insects, but I wouldn't want to deny you the opportunity to show off your entomological skills.

First we have Matthew's little friend. Note its wingedness and beady little eyes. I also see a hint of malevolence in its stance.





















Then we have Mr. Tusk here. Victoria came across this 4 - 5 inch, tusked monster while rolling into her garage. It refrained from eating her, which has left her wondering what manner of beast it is. I'm thinking it's devil spawn, but I don't know the taxonomy on that.

19 comments:

TeratoMarty said...

Where were these bugs found? Having a geographical location can aid in identification. However, the one on top looks like the f***in' ginormous cockroaches of Texas, USA.

TravelBug said...

The bottom one looks like its related to the horned beetles in Arizona.

Jade said...

I hate to admit it, but you've got me stumped!

Laughing Stone said...

Bottom one is a dobsonfly. The top one might be related to crickets - hard to tell much from the angle.

CaseyL said...

Bottom one is a dobsonfly.

WTF?? 4-5 inches long, tusked, and it's a fly??

Please tell me you're kidding.

And if you're not, please tell me where those things live. So I can make sure I never, ever go there.

Laughing Stone said...

http://www.whatsthatbug.com/dobs.html

nicklebee said...

try bugguide.net

Arachnophile said...

I have to agree with laughing stone about the bottom one. I'd put money on it being a Dobson fly - don't worry, they eat bugs. ;)

That first one looks like a lot of things, without a view from the top, i'd be reluctant to guess.

Kritter said...

There are tons of Dobson Fly pictures on What's That Bug--the larvae and pupae are truly hideous. The larvae are called hellgramites and are used for bait.

Jade said...

The top one does look a lot like some type of cricket.

Rachel said...

The first insect is, perhaps, a Stonefly.

Much like the Dobsonfly in the second picture, it's not even close to being a true fly. They belong to Order Plecoptera.

Without a top-down photo I wouldn't swear by it, but I'm pretty confidant.

pkeli said...

I know what both of these are. The bottom on is a Ifthatcomesnearme I'mgoingtorunscreaming likealittlegirl insect and the top one is a close relative even though they don't look alike. I'm sure I'm right.

Nonexistant Black Feather said...

I've only ever seen the larvae for these guys. We did kick sampling in the local creek for a couple of my college classes.

Jane said...

The bottom one looks like what we called (in south Alabama) Japanese tree beetles. Perhaps that's what a dobsonfly is?

All I know is, I got one of those wedged in the neck of my band uniform on the marching field at a home game once (25 years ago) and I FREAKED THE FRICK OUT, all the while remaining completely stone-faced and executing marching drills with my trombone perfectly cocked. I had to practically bleach my neck when I got home to stop having the willies. I STILL have residual heebyjeebies thinking about it.

Huhhhhhuhhh.

Anonymous said...

I think the first might be a leafhopper insect. I thought that the second was a Staghorn beetle, but i might be wrong.

AutiMama & Joshua said...

I have no idea what either of things things are other than (like you said) the spawn of the devil, LOL!! I love coming to your blog ... you always cheer us up. We are building a science course around your uglies, LOL!!!!

Thanks a ton for your humor!!

Raging Wombat said...

Thank you for the kind words!

Anonymous said...

That bottom one is most likely a Dobsonfly, which is not a fly at all (just like a dragonfly isn't a fly, or a starfish isn't a fish... common names can be confusing). I saw one in Costa Rica, and got brave enough to touch it. I dont think the jaws can do much to people, as they feel kind of flimsy or fragile, so they're probably more for fighting other males, or for displaying to females (which have short, blunt jaws that DO look like they could give a nasty pinch).
Dobsonflies are in the family Corydalidae, and they have been placed in their own order, Megaloptera, although they may be related to lacewings and ant lions, and hence are sometimes placed in the lacewing order Neuroptera.

that's all I have to say about that.

Anonymous said...

Please can someone help me with identifying another insect??
I found a very odd insect in my bathroom this morning and think it came in from the pine tree outside the window. I didn't take a photograph as I just wanted to get rid of it. It was so strange and ugly it freaked me out. It was quite small and or a beige/brown/neutral colour and looked like a bit of fluff or roughed up fabric - no particular body shape at all. i actually thought it was fluff in the beginning but then it moved and i noticed little furry creamy coloured legs underneath. it moved in a spidery crab like way. i couldn't see any head/eyes. has anyone any idea what this could have been? it was a horrible looking thing (and I am a pathetic weak girl when it comes to spiders/insects).
Please help!
liz in Rome (Italy)